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Outreach Centers

UHMC Outreach Centers If you live on Molokai, Lanai, or the communities of Hana and West Maui, access to higher education no longer means a move or a long commute. University of Hawaii Maui College provides access to numerous associate degree programs, non-credit courses through Edventure and bachelors and masters degree programs through the University of Hawai’i Center, Maui. Classes are taught on-site, via cable, interactive TV, and the internet. To find out current course offerings or more information visit the center’s website or contact the centers directly. UHMC Molokai Education Center 375 Kamehameha V Highway P.O. Box 440 Kaunakakai, HI 96748 Phone: (808) 553-4490 Fax: (808) 553-4495 UHMC Molokai Farm P.O. Box 511 526 Hua’ai Road Hoolehua, HI 96729 Phone: (808) 567-6577 Fax: (808) 553-4495 UHMC Lana‘i Education Center 329 7th Street P.O. Box 630648 Lana’i City, HI 96763 Phone: (808) 565-7266 Fax: (808) 565-7269 UHMC Lahaina Education Center 60 Kenui St. Lahaina, HI 96761 Phone: (808) 662-3911 Fax: (808) 662-3913 Email: mcc96761@hawaii.edu UHMC Hana Education Center 5101 Uakea, Rm 10 & Rm 12 PO Box 70 Hana, HI 96713 Email: hanauhmaui@gmail.com Phone: (808) 248-7380 Fax: (808) 248-7392

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It’s easy to apply to the University of Hawaiʻi Maui College! You can submit your application in just minutes using our online form. You can also check our class availability online. No essays, no SAT’s required! If you have any questions, feel free to send us an email or give us a call. We’re here to help. Lower level courses are $126.00 per credit for residents and $340.00 per credit for non-residents. Upper division 300 and 400 level courses are $300.00 per credit for residents and $840.00 per credit for non-residents. Click here for the complete list of tuition and fees. You can also apply for financial aid or use our net price calculator to estimate cost of attendance — including tuition and required fees, books and supplies, and other related expenses. Wherever you are on your academic journey, we have the innovative programs and supportive student services to help you succeed in college, and beyond. Pursue a bachelor of applied science degree in emerging industries like Sustainable Science Management, Engineering Technology, and Applied Business and Information Technology, or an associate’s degree or certificate from over 20 other programs. Click here to view our Programs of Study. Maui College offers students a wide range of support services. These services include financial, personal, and academic. Click here to view our Student Support Services. First Year Experience The UHMC First Year Experience (FYE) Office provides first year students with a comprehensive set of programs designed to support their transition to college and foster their academic success. Once accepted, each student must complete Online Orientation, schedule their Academic Advising Appointment, and attend the UHMC Welcome. These three steps are required before you embark on your

Strategic Directions Implementation

2015-2021 Strategic Directions UHMC 2015-2021 Strategic Directions Document UH Maui College has established a process to connect resource allocation directly to program review and strategic planning. This assessment-focused process aligns resource allocations with planning in support of student learning. The recently established Strategic Planning Council facilitates this process toward establishing campus priorities that are grounded in results from degree program level assessment of student learning and input from the broader community. Click here for more information on the preparation for the UHMC 2015-2021 Strategic Directions. Moving forward, implementation of the Strategic Directions will be led by the Strategic Planning Council which includes representation from each theme group, administration, and UHMC Student Government. Ferdouz Cochran, Chair of Sustainability Committee, Instructor of Sustainable Science Management Angela Gannon, Co-chair of Community Needs and Workforce Development, Vice Chair of Sustainability Committee, Office of the Vice Chancellor Ben Guerrero, Co-chair of Student Success Committee, Title III Coordinator David Tamanaha, Vice Chancellor of Administrative Affairs Debra Nakama, Vice Chancellor of Student Affairs Elaine Yamashita, Co-chair of Strategic Planning Council, Professor of Early Childhood Education Hokulani Holt-Padilla, Co-chair of Hawai‘i Papa O Ke Ao Committee, Hawai’i Papa O Ke Ao Coordinator John McKee, Vice Chancellor of Academic Affairs Juli Patao, Co-chair of Community Needs and Workforce Development Committee, Director of CareerLink Julie Powers, Co-chair of Quality of Learning, Associate Professor of Early Childhood Education Karen Hanada, Director of UH Center Maui Kī‘ope Raymond, Co-chair of Hawai‘i Papa O Ke Ao Committee, Associate Professor of Hawaiian Studies Kristine Korey-Smith, Co-chair of Student Success Committee, Director of the Learning Center Laura Lees Nagle, Co-chair of Strategic Planning Council, Associate Professor of English Lui Hokoana, Chancellor Maggie Ward, Co-chair of Quality of Learning, Assistant

Faculty and Lecturer Handbook

The University of Hawai’i Maui College (UHMC) serves the educational needs of residents of the three islands comprising Maui County: Molokai, Lana’i , and Maui. Mission, Vision, Core Values Strategic Plan History There are several resources, policies and procedures that you will need to know and reference while working on Maui campus.  Here are key items for your quick reference and if you need further information, please contact your department chair. Campus Security Campus Health Center Smoking Policy Campus Mail Electronic Mail News at UH and UHMC Telephones Personnel Information Campus Policies Details regarding duty period, exam weeks and what to do when you are absent from campus can be referenced below.  If you need further information, have questions or comments, please contact your department chair. Duty Period Final Exam Week Absence Due to Illness or Emergency Class Cancellation Duty Period  Faculty are on duty from approximately August 14 until May 14 (dates may vary slightly due to calendar changes).  Teachers’ primary responsibilities during that time include conducting assigned classes, attending campus meetings, and performing committee work. One office hour per week must be held for each class taught.  The hour should be scheduled at a time when most students in the class are available, and the teacher should be consistently present during that time.  Each semester, faculty members must post current class schedules and office hours on their office doors during the first week of school and provide a copy to their department secretary. Final Exam Week The last week of each semester is final exam week.  The week begins with a reading day that allows students to prepare for the final assessment. Final exam schedules can be found at insert

University of Hawaii Maui College Executive Summary 2011-12

Instruction For academic year 2011-12, the Career and Technical Education (CTE) and the Liberal Arts programs submitted a total of 17 annual, 6 comprehensive, and 3 developmental program reviews. Each CTE review included a special emphasis on an overall assessment of their outcomes at both the course and program levels. Program Reviews are reviewed by the assessment coordinator, a peer faculty or staff, and the Vice Chancellor of Academic Affairs, who provide constructive feedback to program coordinators. As a result of this program review process, during the 2011-12 academic year, programs continue to make progress mapping their courses to the Program Learning Outcomes (PLOs) of their program, and each program continues to seek validation and support of their PLOs from their respective advisory committees. Additionally, programs have are mapping college-wide student learning outcomes into their course and program analysis, and will begin aligning each to Institutional Learning Outcomes that are being developed through a campus-wide process led by a Strategic Planning Committee. During the year, UH Maui College experienced changes in their program health call indicators. Four programs were classed as healthy (one less than last year), 14 were ranked as cautionary (one more than last year), and only one programs (Hospitality and Tourism-HOST) scored an unhealthy call down from two last year). The unhealthy call for the HOST program is attributed to an unexpected decrease in job opportunities due to the economic downturn. The college met its Perkins Core indicator goals for 1P1 (Technical Skills Attainment) that it had missed last year, but the 2P1 (Credential, Certificate, or Degree) measure continues to be a challenge. Department Chairs and Program Coordinators have been made aware of these deficiencies and have been challenged to improve these

University of Hawaii Maui College Executive Summary 2013-14

Instruction For academic year 2013-14, the Career and Technical Education (CTE) and the Liberal Arts programs submitted a total of 24 instructional and three developmental program reviews. Each CTE review included a special emphasis on an overall assessment of their outcomes at both the course and program levels. As a result of this program review process, during the 2013-14 academic year, programs continue to make progress mapping their courses to the Program Learning Outcomes (PLOs) of their program, and each program continues to seek validation and support of their PLOs from their respective advisory committees. Additionally, programs have begun mapping college-wide student learning outcomes (CASLOs) into their course and program analysis, and will continue to align each to Institutional Learning Outcomes that have been developed through a campus-wide process led by our Strategic Planning Committee. For academic year 2013-14, special emphasis was placed on Information Literacy. Health call indicators continued to improve during the 2013-14 period.  Eight programs were classed as healthy (five more than last year), 11 were ranked as cautionary (two less than last year), and no programs received an overall unhealthy rating (down two from the previous year). The college met four of the six Perkins indicators for 2013-14, falling short in 1P1 (Technical Skills Attainment), and 4P1 (Student Placement). All seven of the Community Colleges failed to meet the 4P1 indicator, therefore it will received priority Perkins funding for the 2015-16 proposal year. Department Chairs, Program Coordinators, Counselors, and Career Link have been made aware of these deficiencies and have been challenged to improve these during the 2015-2016 academic year, and to address them in their next program reviews. Support Programs UH Maui College Academic Support programs including the four outreach

University of Hawaii Maui College Executive Summary-2012-13

Instruction For academic year 2012-13, the Career and Technical Education (CTE) and the Liberal Arts programs submitted a total of 24 instructional and 3 developmental program reviews. Each CTE review included a special emphasis on an overall assessment of their outcomes at both the course and program levels. Program Reviews are reviewed by the assessment coordinator, a peer faculty or staff, and the Vice Chancellor of Academic Affairs, who provided constructive feedback to program coordinators. As a result of this program review process, during the 2012-13 academic year, programs continue to make progress mapping their courses to the Program Learning Outcomes (PLOs) of their program, and each program continues to seek validation and support of their PLOs from their respective advisory committees. Additionally, programs have begun mapping college-wide student learning outcomes (CASLOs) into their course and program analysis, and will continue to align each to Institutional Learning Outcomes that are being developed through a campus-wide process led by a Strategic Planning Committee. During the year, UH Maui College experienced changes in their program health call indicators. Eight programs were classed as healthy (four more than last year), 13 were ranked as cautionary (one less than last year), and only three programs scored an unhealthy call (up two from the previous year). The increase in unhealthy calls for is attributed to an unexpected decrease in job opportunities due to the economic downturn, and the inclusion in two new programs in Natural Science and Hawaiian Studies, both of which are getting established. The college met all 2011-12 Perkins Core indicator goals except for 2P1 (Credential, Certificate, or Degree). This measure continues to be a challenge. Department Chairs and Program Coordinators have been made aware of these deficiencies

Molokai Education Center

                                                    Welcome E ho’ona’auao honua ‘oiai ma ka hale  •  A world of knowledge here at home About us Approximately 250 students call University of Hawaii Maui College, Molokai their home campus. These students are taking courses leading towards certificates and associate degrees in seven primary majors: Liberal Arts, Agriculture and Natural Resources, Business Careers, Early Childhood Education, Hawaiian Studies, Human Services, and Allied Health: Nurse Aide Training and Therapeutic Activity Aide I & II. Quick Student Body Facts 75% of 250 students enrolled each semester are Native Hawaiian ancestry-by fa, the highest percentage of any campus in the University of Hawaii system. A high percentage of students are non-traditional 75% are female At the Spring 2012 Commencement, 194 student graduates from Fall 2008-Spring 2012 were recognized.  The graduates ranged in age from 18 to 64 years old. They were the parents of 246 children and 48 grandchildren. There were 8 couples oarent and child gradutes; and 9 set of siblings. Two of these graduates have already earned their bachelor's degrees and 18 more are currently enrolled in bachelor's degree program. The University Center, Maui brings a variety of bachelors and masters degree programs to Molokai from the campuses of UH Manoa, UH Hilo, UH West Oahu utilizing interactive, off-island travel, and the Internet. University of Hawaii Maui College, Molokai employs 6 full-time and 2 part-time staff. There are also 3 full-time federally funded staff. In addition, approximately 20 different Molokau lectuerers are hired each semester to deliver instruction in their area of expertise.   Admissions Apply Now Applicants must

Distance Education Student Support

Login Sites & Support Laulima Login Laulima Training Sessions Email Laulima Support UH Web Mail MyUH Portal How to Use MyUH Portal UH System IT Information for Students UH iTunesU Online Learning Services All UHCC Distance Courses Maui University Center Academic Help Library The Learning Center Other Resources Centers, Labs, & Library Hours UH-Maui College Availability Bookstore Help Desk Counseling and Advising  Email a UHMC Counselor Faculty and Staff Directory

Campus Security

EMERGENCY NUMBERS: Campus Security direct line: (808) 984·3255 From a Campus phone: 255 Maui Police Department: 911 This report is provided in compliance with the Crime Awareness and of 1992. Campus Security Act of 1990 and Higher Education Act Amendments UHMC is an equal opportunity/affirmative action institution. Introduction The University of Hawai‘i Maui College (UHMC) is firmly committed to providing a safe and secure campus environment. Policies and procedures are designed to provide precautionary measures to protect people and property. However, each member of the UHMC community should use good judgment and take appropriate precautions to reduce the possibility of becoming the victim of a crime on campus. The following report is provided in an effort to notify the community about certain crimes that have been committed on the Maui College Campus, as well as to promote awareness of current programs available for your safety and well-being. The UHMC campus consists of 40 academic, administrative, and recreational buildings situated throughout 78 acres. In addition, the Maui College campus directly supports Outreach Educational Centers at Molokai, Lana`i, Lahaina, Hana and Kihei. The campus population consists of approximately 4,400 day and night students, and approximately 255 faculty and staff. Campus Security consists of 2 department personnel: a chief, and one security officer, with additional security provided by a contracted private security company. Mission Statement: The University of Hawaii Maui College Campus Security Department is firmly committed to providing a safe and secure environment for our students, faculty, staff and guests. Our policies and procedures are designed to ensure that every possible precautionary measure is taken to protect persons and property. The Campus Security Department, under the administration of the Vice Chancellor of Administrative Services, is responsible for providing security services