Higher Education News

Toolkit: So Many Tools, So Much Time by Joe Ganci

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Joe has reviewed many of the better-known authoring and eLearning development tools. There are
many
other tools that don’t get much market recognition, yet they have enthusiastic users. Here’s your chance
to
tell Joe which ones you would like to know more about—he’ll provide summary reviews later this year
for
the most-requested and those he considers the best.

New eBook: 76 Tips for Turning Instructional Design Challenges into Successes by News Editor

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Everybody hits a rough patch now and then; quick, effective reaction makes the difference between
success and failure. If you’re looking for tips on turning problems into triumphs, download 76 Tips for
Turning Instructional Design Challenges into Successes from The eLearning Guild—today!

EMEA Reporter: Out of the Weak Came Forth Strength by Nic Laycock

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Ireland has always had a proud academic tradition. This article showcases Enterprise Ireland, which
identifies good business initiatives in their start-up phase and supports them with exposure, advice,
and
funding. Learn about innovation and creativity at the cutting edge of the learning industry, in places
where
hardship from the EU financial crisis required new approaches.

Mobile eLearning Design: How to Survive Your First mLearning Project by J.P. Medved

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Developing your first mLearning application is likely to present some new challenges, but planning ahead
will smooth your path to success! Here is a step-by-step guide to managing the process and the project.

Nuts and Bolts: Expectations by Jane Bozarth

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How can you spark a conversation between 12,000 employees in 66 countries … simultaneously? Kimberly-
Clark did it, and it worked because they recognized that if you want people to really connect via social
tools you’ll allow room for human conversation. Just like in “real life.” Read about the experience, and the
unexpected outcomes here!

New landscape training at Leeward CC

Leeward Community College

Leeward Community College

Hawaiʻi’s pleasant year-round weather makes for a lush and green environment, which requires a steady supply of landscape technicians. Helping to meet this industry demand is Leeward Community College’s Office of Continuing Education and Workforce Development. Beginning in February 2014 they will offer a new course – Basic Training in Landscape Maintenance and Installation.

Green Industry Pro magazine’s Fall 2012 Landscape Contractor’s Business Outlook showed that 53 percent of companies expect to be more profitable in 2013 recording increases in lawn care providers, irrigation, maintenance and installation. The need for qualified and highly trained landscape technicians is on the rise.

The 48-hour course will be delivered through a series of classes February 13–May 15 and has a participant cost of $450. The course blends classroom learning with hands-on experience, based on the Professional Landcare Network Training manual.

Class topics

  • Landscape maintenance equipment safety
  • Prevention of common accidents and injuries
  • Read and understand a landscape plan
  • Identify common landscape plants and pests
  • Repair and maintain irrigation systems
  • Assess soil problems and select proper amendments
  • Softscape installation
  • Properly install and maintain ornamentals and turf
  • Identify sustainable landscape maintenance practices

The course is intended to provide entry level students with a good fundamental background in landscape maintenance, and may be used as an excellent study guide for experienced landscapers preparing to take the Landscape Industry Certified Technician exam series that aims to raise industry standards by upgrading the status of landscape professionals in the areas of installation, maintenance and irrigation.

This training was made available as part of the Trade Adjustment Assistance Community College Career Training Grant, better known as C3T Hawaiʻi.

A Leeward Community College news release

Team Hawaii competes in Nagoya micro robot maze competition

Team Hawaiʻi

Team Hawaiʻi

Honolulu Community College students competed in the 22nd Annual Nagoya Micro Robot Maze Competition held at Nagoya University in Japan in November. Competing as Team Hawaiʻi Robotics, led by advisor Assistant Professor Norman Takeya, students competed with students from different countries across Asia.

The students were exposed to the Japanese culture, made new friends with international students, and experienced competing on a world-class level. Honolulu CC was the only two-year college represented in the competition and second team from Hawaiʻi. The other was from Waiākea High School.

“I believe that every competitor in the competition had the same build and design process but different ideas emerged from different teams, some a lot better than others,” shared Jarrett Kahoʻokele, a liberal arts major.

Psy robot

Mabel Wong’s Psy Robot

“Although we didn’t place in the top three, I feel very proud of myself and the team for placing 6th and competing in general. We were competing with, and did better than, some four-year colleges,” said Mabel Wong, a construction management student who built a robot that danced Psy’s Gangnum Style.

For Jasmine Hoapili, a Honolulu CC student and ʻIKE Scholar, she found similarities with the Hawaiian and Japanese cultures. “When we visited Atsuta shrine it made me feel respectful, just like the spiritual sites on Oʻahu. It created a desire for me to embrace my culture and learn more about it.”

Team Hawaiʻi Robotics is comprised of students from various University of Hawaiʻi campuses including UH Mānoa, Honolulu CC, Leeward CC, and Kapiʻolani CC.

The team has qualified for the VEX Robotics World Championships to be held in Anaheim, California. They will be competing with 80 other collegiate teams from around the world in April 2014. Last year Team Hawaiʻi came in 15th place, the third highest ranking U.S. team.

Read the Honolulu CC news release for the full story.

PEARL produces trainer’s guide for student research

PEARL guide cover

Pathways for Excellence and Achievement in Research and Learning (PEARL) participants have produced an online trainer’s guide to help students with research. The teams designed and implemented collaborative instructional approaches in reading, writing and thinking critically to assist students in creating projects across diverse disciplines.

The three-year project provided professional development for teams of teachers and librarians from 20 Hawaiʻi DOE and private schools working on researching skills with their students.

The trainer’s guide is downloadable from the PEARL website. The site also showcases examples of student projects as well as teaching resources for the instructors.

Karen Lee, executive director of the Hawaiʻi P–20 Partnerships for Education, noted that the project is “a perfect example of work done in the cross-sector space that builds critical skills in our high school students to be ready for life after college.”

More about PEARL

PEARL is funded by the University of Hawaiʻi at Mānoa Institute of Museum and Library Services and directed by the Library and Information Science Program in the Department of Information and Computer Sciences.

Members of the PEARL development team were Carolyn Kirio, Kapolei Middle School; Sandy Yamamoto, Kapolei High School; Michael-Brian Ogawa, UH Mānoa Department of Information and Computer Sciences; Jodie Mattos, UH Mānoa Libraries; Megan Terawaki, PEARL graduate assistant; and Kendyll Doi and Ed Meyer, PEARL technical support members.

Strengthening the UH Cancer Center for Hawaii

UH Cancer Center building

University of Hawaiʻi Cancer Center

The University of Hawaiʻi Cancer Center is one of the institutions most critical to the health and well-being of our community. The State of Hawaiʻi has made a remarkable and well-considered investment in the center. The University of Hawaiʻi deeply appreciates that investment and the trust placed in us to leverage that investment to fight cancer in Hawaiʻi.

Over the last weeks there has been considerable public discourse about the center. Rather than looking backwards, we would like to share the specific steps we are now taking to strengthen the management and operations of the center to ensure its success.

It is important that we begin with some basic principles and commitments:

  • Our vision is improved cancer care in Hawaiʻi for Hawaiʻi residents and contributing substantively to a world without cancer.
  • The UH Cancer Center serves the community and the state in achieving that vision.
  • The UH Cancer Center focuses on the creation of knowledge about cancer and collaboration with our community hospitals, practitioners, patients and others committed to battling cancer in Hawaiʻi and beyond.
  • The UH Cancer Center clinical trials program is designed to work with its partner hospitals to provide cutting edge cancer treatments to local residents so that cancer patients do not have to travel to the mainland for access to the most modern therapies.

Our approaches to serving the community and the state are grounded in:

The recent controversy has focused on management issues at the center. We recognize the need to strengthen management support. Our first step in addressing this is to solidify and clarify the leadership team. Accordingly, as of Monday, January 13 the leadership team of the UH Cancer Center will consist of the following:

  • Dr. Michele Carbone will continue as director of the UH Cancer Center, an Organized Research Unit of the UH Mānoa campus. Dr. Carbone is the architect of the innovative consortium through which the UH Cancer Center works to serve Hawaiʻi. He led the renewal of the NCI designation in which the National Cancer Institute Review Board rated the overall performance of the Cancer Center as “Excellent” and rated him “Outstanding” as director. Dr. Carbone will continue to provide forward-looking vision and leadership for the future of the center and its research. He will set organizational direction, lead recruitment and fundraising and continue his own research program, through which he exemplifies his personal and organizational commitment to academic excellence.
  • Dr. Patricia Blanchette will join the UH Cancer Center as associate director for administration and chief operating officer. Dr. Blanchette will be leaving her current role as CEO of UCERA, the faculty practice organization created to support the clinical, academic and research activities of the John A. Burns School of Medicine and other clinical practices. She has led UCERA from a challenging past to a strong present position with a positive future. She holds AA, BA, MD and MPH degrees from UH and has been recognized as a UH Distinguished Alumna. Over the past decades Dr. Blanchette has served UH Mānoa as a faculty member, as a highly productive researcher, as a department chair, and on the faculty Senate Executive Committee.
  • The Cancer Center and Dr. Carbone report to Dr. Brian Taylor, (interim) vice chancellor for research for UH Mānoa. Dr. Taylor also leads the UH Mānoa School of Ocean Earth Science and Technology, the largest and most successful Organized Research Unit at UH. He is one of UH’s strongest research administrators with experience leading over 900 faculty and staff responsible for over $100 million per year in research funding. Dr. Taylor has been with UH for over 30 years.
  • Dr. Virginia Hinshaw has agreed to serve as senior advisor to Dr. Carbone and Dr. Taylor. Dr. Hinshaw is the former chancellor of UH Mānoa who presided over the campus during the establishment of the UH Cancer Consortium. She is a distinguished researcher with previous NIH experience and a nationally recognized research administrator who has worked with cancer centers at four different universities. She currently represents JABSOM on the Cancer Center Executive Committee.

The new leadership team is charged to establish a sound organizational and financial capacity for the center and the consortium that supports a successful renewal of our NCI designation. It will achieve this by:

  • Ensuring that procedures and practices support excellence in collaborative scholarship and stewardship of public resources.
  • Establishing an improved dialog within the UH Cancer Center around the complex and multi-faceted issues that must be addressed for the center to achieve its goals.
  • Creating an environment in which center administrators, faculty and staff can best utilize their strengths.
  • Developing and executing a prudent financial plan that supports successful renewal of our NCI designation.

It’s time to move beyond the interpersonal drama that has played out in recent weeks. We are committed to working together to polish our jewel, the UH Cancer Center, the only designated National Cancer Institute within 2,500 miles of Hawaiʻi’s cancer patients, hospitals and practitioners. We invite everyone within UH and the community who is committed to the creation of knowledge to end cancer in our lifetimes to join us in moving forward together.

John Holzman, Chair, UH Board of Regents
David Lassner, Interim President, UH
Tom Apple, Chancellor, UH Mānoa
Brian Taylor, Interim Vice Chancellor for Research, UH Mānoa
Michele Carbone, Director, UH Cancer Center

A University of Hawaiʻi System news release

New Hilo home for Hawaiian language

The movement to preserve and perpetuate the Hawaiian language—that started decades ago—took another step forward in 2014 with the opening of Haleʻōlelo, the University of Hawaiʻi at Hilo’s Ka Haka ʻUla O Keʻelikōlani College of Hawaiian Language.

Previously, the college’s programs and operations were scattered throughout the campus.

“Ka Haka ʻUla O Keʻelikōlani has now a honua, an environment where language, Hawaiian language, can sustain and be used, at all times,” said Keiki Kawaiʻaeʻa, the College of Hawaiian Language director.

The $21 million dollar, two story, 36,000 square foot complex features a performing arts auditorium, classrooms, library, media resource room, computer lab, meeting rooms and offices.

“A lot of my teachers have been fighting for this, for years, years and years, decades, way before I was even thought of,” said UH Hilo student ʻĀlika Guerrero. “So to be a part of it, this new building, I mean it is a victory, not only for me, but my parents, my grandparents, and my kids to come, my grandkids.”

group of students

The Haleʻōlelo blessing ceremony at the University of Hawaiʻi at Hilo on January 11, 2014.

The Haleʻōlelo blessing and grand opening was steeped in Hawaiian tradition with a ʻOki Piko ceremony, symbolizing the severing of the umbilical cord and the start of the building’s new life; heahea, or calls of welcome and singing of traditional Hawaiian songs.

The festivities then moved to the college’s new auditorium for hula performances and speeches.

“This building represents, to the members of UH Hilo, our dedication to being a Hawaiian university and all of the meanings of those words,” said UH Hilo Chancellor Donald Straney. “A university where you learn all subjects in Hawaiian, a university where Hawaiian language and values inform what we do.”

“This is a beautiful and spectacular building and traditional building,” said UH System Interim President David Lassner. “And it is also a modern building. This is a building that will connect Hawaiʻi, Hawaiians and Hawaiian language to the world.”

The College of Hawaiian Language is already internationally recognized for its undergraduate, master’s and PhD programs; indigenous teacher training, distance learning programs and Ulukau electronic library.

Alongside the Hawaiian curriculum work and the Hale Kuamoʻo Hawaiian Language Center, the college serves as an important example for other indigenous language efforts around the world.

Haleʻōlelo provides needed state-of-the-art infrastructure that will allow the college to grow, develop and expand and further perpetuate the Hawaiian language and culture.

“It is a huge contribution into moving us to that that next level,” said Kawaiʻaeʻa.

<img src="http://farm3.staticflickr.com/2828/11935145155_2d0f72ac80.jpg" title="Hawaiian language lives at UH Hilo" alt="

The front entranceway to Haleʻōlelo, the home of of the University of Hawai‘i at Hilo’s Ka Haka ‘Ula O Ke‘elikōlani College of Hawaiian Language. Haleʻōlelo is Hawaiian for house of language.

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Hawaiian language lives at UH Hilo

The front entranceway to Haleʻōlelo, the home of of the University of Hawai‘i at Hilo’s Ka Haka ‘Ula O Ke‘elikōlani College of Hawaiian Language. Haleʻōlelo is Hawaiian for house of language.

<img src="http://farm8.staticflickr.com/7446/11935426023_04a1d5d19d.jpg" title="Hawaiian language lives at UH Hilo" alt="

A stairwell in Hale‘ōlelo, the new home of the University of Hawai‘i at Hilo’s Ka Haka ‘Ula O Ke‘elikōlani College of Hawaiian Language. On the left is an image of Papa, mother earth, with exerpts from a mele, or song, written in honor of Princess Ruth Ke‘elikōlani, for whom the college is named. The image on the right is of Wakea, father sky, with exerpts from traditional chants that describe the birthing of the Hawaiian islands.

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Hawaiian language lives at UH Hilo

A stairwell in Hale‘ōlelo, the new home of the University of Hawai‘i at Hilo’s Ka Haka ‘Ula O Ke‘elikōlani College of Hawaiian Language. On the left is an image of Papa, mother earth, with exerpts from a mele, or song, written in honor of Princess Ruth Ke‘elikōlani, for whom the college is named. The image on the right is of Wakea, father sky, with exerpts from traditional chants that describe the birthing of the Hawaiian islands.

<img src="http://farm6.staticflickr.com/5532/11935993386_cc9608edf1.jpg" title="Hawaiian language lives at UH Hilo" alt="

A mural of Papa, mother earth, in the stairwell of Hale‘ōlelo, the home UH Hilo’s Ka Haka ‘Ula O Ke‘elikōlani College of Hawaiian Language. The college was named after Princess Ruth Ke‘elikōlani and part of her signature can be seen on the left side of the image.

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Hawaiian language lives at UH Hilo

A mural of Papa, mother earth, in the stairwell of Hale‘ōlelo, the home UH Hilo’s Ka Haka ‘Ula O Ke‘elikōlani College of Hawaiian Language. The college was named after Princess Ruth Ke‘elikōlani and part of her signature can be seen on the left side of the image.

<img src="http://farm6.staticflickr.com/5475/11935158885_5425f87722.jpg" title="Hawaiian language lives at UH Hilo" alt="

A key feature of Haleʻōlelo is the high roof design inspired by the pili grass thatched home of Princess Ruth Ke‘elikōlani, for whom the College is named: Ka Haka ‘Ula O Ke‘elikōlani College of Hawaiian Language. Ke‘elikōlani’s home, on the grounds of Hulihe‘e Palace in Kailua-Kona on Hawaiʻi island, was known as Hale‘ōlelo, or house of language.

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Hawaiian language lives at UH Hilo

A key feature of Haleʻōlelo is the high roof design inspired by the pili grass thatched home of Princess Ruth Ke‘elikōlani, for whom the College is named: Ka Haka ‘Ula O Ke‘elikōlani College of Hawaiian Language. Ke‘elikōlani’s home, on the grounds of Hulihe‘e Palace in Kailua-Kona on Hawaiʻi island, was known as Hale‘ōlelo, or house of language.

<img src="http://farm8.staticflickr.com/7425/11935996346_64ac8b724f.jpg" title="Hawaiian language lives at UH Hilo" alt="

The ceiling of the Performing Arts Auditorium in Hale‘ōlelo, the home of UH Hilo’s Ka Haka ‘Ula O Ke‘elikōlani College of Hawaiian Language opened in January 2014.

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Hawaiian language lives at UH Hilo

The ceiling of the Performing Arts Auditorium in Hale‘ōlelo, the home of UH Hilo’s Ka Haka ‘Ula O Ke‘elikōlani College of Hawaiian Language opened in January 2014.

<img src="http://farm8.staticflickr.com/7459/11935439293_edc63640ff.jpg" title="Hawaiian language lives at UH Hilo" alt="

In addition to Haleʻōlelo being a cultural and architectural landmark, the two-story complex is also a highly functional facility, spanning 36,760 square feet. Among its key features is a Performing Arts Auditorium and special-use rooms that include a library, curriculum and media resource room, tutorial, archive and telecom conference rooms, a computer lab, student and faculty meeting rooms and 30 offices.

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Hawaiian language lives at UH Hilo

In addition to Haleʻōlelo being a cultural and architectural landmark, the two-story complex is also a highly functional facility, spanning 36,760 square feet. Among its key features is a Performing Arts Auditorium and special-use rooms that include a library, curriculum and media resource room, tutorial, archive and telecom conference rooms, a computer lab, student and faculty meeting rooms and 30 offices.

<img src="http://farm3.staticflickr.com/2829/11936005316_6ac9393520.jpg" title="Hawaiian language lives at UH Hilo" alt="

Haleʻōlelo is situated in a spectacular landscape with mountain and ocean views and designs that reflect Native Hawaiian culture and Hawai‘i island’s natural resources.

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Hawaiian language lives at UH Hilo

Haleʻōlelo is situated in a spectacular landscape with mountain and ocean views and designs that reflect Native Hawaiian culture and Hawai‘i island’s natural resources.

<img src="http://farm4.staticflickr.com/3733/11935347116_ae3ea3ab29.jpg" title="Hawaiian language lives at UH Hilo" alt="

Under the tutelage of kumu hula and facultly Kalena Silva and Kekoa Harman, Ka Haka ʻUla O Keʻelikōlani’s students perform dances honoring Princess Ruth Keanolani Kanāhoahoa Keʻelikōlani at the grand opening of Haleʻōlelo.

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Hawaiian language lives at UH Hilo

Under the tutelage of kumu hula and facultly Kalena Silva and Kekoa Harman, Ka Haka ʻUla O Keʻelikōlani’s students perform dances honoring Princess Ruth Keanolani Kanāhoahoa Keʻelikōlani at the grand opening of Haleʻōlelo.

<img src="http://farm3.staticflickr.com/2840/11934511045_0865a0e784.jpg" title="Hawaiian language lives at UH Hilo" alt="

The piko and the koʻi, traditional Hawaiian axe, used during a formal ‘Oki Piko ceremony during the grand opening of Hale‘ōlelo, the new home of the UH Hilo’s Ka Haka ‘Ula O Ke‘elikōlani College of Hawaiian Language. The ceremony symbolized the cutting of the umbilical cord to separate Haleʻōlelo from its birth mother to begin its life.

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Hawaiian language lives at UH Hilo

The piko and the koʻi, traditional Hawaiian axe, used during a formal ‘Oki Piko ceremony during the grand opening of Hale‘ōlelo, the new home of the UH Hilo’s Ka Haka ‘Ula O Ke‘elikōlani College of Hawaiian Language. The ceremony symbolized the cutting of the umbilical cord to separate Haleʻōlelo from its birth mother to begin its life.

<img src="http://farm3.staticflickr.com/2843/11934513885_b61d6bd3b9.jpg" title="Hawaiian language lives at UH Hilo" alt="

Hundreds attended the official grand opening of Hale‘ōlelo, the new home of theUH Hilo Ka Haka ‘Ula O Keæelikōlani College of Hawaiian Language on Saturday, January 11, 2014. Associate Professor Hiapo Perreira gave the opening speech in Hawaiian on behalf of the college.

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Hawaiian language lives at UH Hilo

Hundreds attended the official grand opening of Hale‘ōlelo, the new home of theUH Hilo Ka Haka ‘Ula O Keæelikōlani College of Hawaiian Language on Saturday, January 11, 2014. Associate Professor Hiapo Perreira gave the opening speech in Hawaiian on behalf of the college.

<img src="http://farm8.staticflickr.com/7363/11935350836_510bea92e6.jpg" title="Hawaiian language lives at UH Hilo" alt="

Pūnana Leo student Kahaʻiʻōlelo Helm introduces himself in Hawaiian before hundreds of people during the grand opening of UH Hilo’s new home for the school’s Ka Haka ‘Ula O Ke‘elikōlani College of Hawaiian Language.

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Hawaiian language lives at UH Hilo

Pūnana Leo student Kahaʻiʻōlelo Helm introduces himself in Hawaiian before hundreds of people during the grand opening of UH Hilo’s new home for the school’s Ka Haka ‘Ula O Ke‘elikōlani College of Hawaiian Language.

<img src="http://farm4.staticflickr.com/3833/11934968804_427cf4ac28.jpg" title="Hawaiian language lives at UH Hilo" alt="

Among those who attended the Haleʻōlelo grand opening were (from left to right) UH Hilo Chancellor Donald Straney, UH Interim President David Lassner, UH Regent Carl Carlson, Hawaiʻi County Mayor Billy Kenoi representative Ilihia Gionson, Governor Neil Abercrombie and members of the Royal Order of Kamehameha.

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Hawaiian language lives at UH Hilo

Among those who attended the Haleʻōlelo grand opening were (from left to right) UH Hilo Chancellor Donald Straney, UH Interim President David Lassner, UH Regent Carl Carlson, Hawaiʻi County Mayor Billy Kenoi representative Ilihia Gionson, Governor Neil Abercrombie and members of the Royal Order of Kamehameha.

<img src="http://farm4.staticflickr.com/3721/11935354686_a76d4fcb12.jpg" title="Hawaiian language lives at UH Hilo" alt="

UH System Interim President David Lassner with UH Hilo Chancellor Donald Straney at the dedication of Hale‘ōlelo, the new home of the UH Hilo Ka Haka ‘Ula O Ke‘elikōlani College of Hawaiian Language.

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Hawaiian language lives at UH Hilo

UH System Interim President David Lassner with UH Hilo Chancellor Donald Straney at the dedication of Hale‘ōlelo, the new home of the UH Hilo Ka Haka ‘Ula O Ke‘elikōlani College of Hawaiian Language.

<img src="http://farm4.staticflickr.com/3708/11935355406_c960388019.jpg" title="Hawaiian language lives at UH Hilo" alt="

Hundreds of people attended the opening ceremony of Hale‘ōlelo, including dignitaries from the Hawaiian community, University of Hawaiʻi and local and state governments, including Governor Neil Abercrombie.

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Hawaiian language lives at UH Hilo

Hundreds of people attended the opening ceremony of Hale‘ōlelo, including dignitaries from the Hawaiian community, University of Hawaiʻi and local and state governments, including Governor Neil Abercrombie.

<img src="http://farm4.staticflickr.com/3771/11934517835_479f997cc3.jpg" title="Hawaiian language lives at UH Hilo" alt="

A traditional Hawaiian greeting, or honi, just before the grand opening ceremony of Hale‘ōlelo, the new home of the UH Hilo Ka Haka ‘Ula O Ke‘elikōlani College of Hawaiian Language.

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Hawaiian language lives at UH Hilo

A traditional Hawaiian greeting, or honi, just before the grand opening ceremony of Hale‘ōlelo, the new home of the UH Hilo Ka Haka ‘Ula O Ke‘elikōlani College of Hawaiian Language.

<img src="http://farm3.staticflickr.com/2844/11934796703_d1c0bae5a6.jpg" title="Hawaiian language lives at UH Hilo" alt="

The women of the ʻAhahui Kaʻahumanu were among the organizational representatives at the grand opening of Haleʻōlelo, the new home of the UH Hilo’s Ka Haka ‘Ula O Ke‘elikōlani College of Hawaiian Language.

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Hawaiian language lives at UH Hilo

The women of the ʻAhahui Kaʻahumanu were among the organizational representatives at the grand opening of Haleʻōlelo, the new home of the UH Hilo’s Ka Haka ‘Ula O Ke‘elikōlani College of Hawaiian Language.

<img src="http://farm4.staticflickr.com/3791/11935357826_d6f42297c0.jpg" title="Hawaiian language lives at UH Hilo" alt="

UH Hilo Hawaiian language students and high schools students from Nāwahīokalaniʻōpuʻu laboratory school holding ti leaves, symbolizing spiritual blessings for the dedication ceremonies.

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Hawaiian language lives at UH Hilo

UH Hilo Hawaiian language students and high schools students from Nāwahīokalaniʻōpuʻu laboratory school holding ti leaves, symbolizing spiritual blessings for the dedication ceremonies.

<img src="http://farm3.staticflickr.com/2834/11935360596_507d39a201.jpg" title="Hawaiian language lives at UH Hilo" alt="

Keiki Kawai‘ae‘a, the director of the UH Hilo Ka Haka ‘Ula O Ke‘elikōlani College of Hawaiian Language with her grand daughter Welina (center) alongside Maenette Benham (left), the dean of the UH Mānoa Hawaiʻinuiākea School of Hawaiian Knowledge and UH Mānoa Hawaiian Studies Professor Lilikala Kame’eleihiwa at grand opening of the college’s new home, Haleʻōlelo.

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Hawaiian language lives at UH Hilo

Keiki Kawai‘ae‘a, the director of the UH Hilo Ka Haka ‘Ula O Ke‘elikōlani College of Hawaiian Language with her grand daughter Welina (center) alongside Maenette Benham (left), the dean of the UH Mānoa Hawaiʻinuiākea School of Hawaiian Knowledge and UH Mānoa Hawaiian Studies Professor Lilikala Kame’eleihiwa at grand opening of the college’s new home, Haleʻōlelo.

<img src="http://farm8.staticflickr.com/7419/11934976824_70f13e2c6f.jpg" title="Hawaiian language lives at UH Hilo" alt="

Keiki Kawai‘ae‘a (center), the director of the UH Hilo Ka Haka ‘Ula O Ke‘elikōlani College of Hawaiian Language with UH Mānoa Hawaiian Studies Professor Lilikala Kame’eleihiwa (left) and her daughter Punihei Lipe (right) at grand opening of the college’s new home, Haleʻōlelo.

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Hawaiian language lives at UH Hilo

Keiki Kawai‘ae‘a (center), the director of the UH Hilo Ka Haka ‘Ula O Ke‘elikōlani College of Hawaiian Language with UH Mānoa Hawaiian Studies Professor Lilikala Kame’eleihiwa (left) and her daughter Punihei Lipe (right) at grand opening of the college’s new home, Haleʻōlelo.

<img src="http://farm8.staticflickr.com/7314/11934800333_8f628fb440.jpg" title="Hawaiian language lives at UH Hilo" alt="

Keiki Kawai‘ae‘a, the director of the UH Hilo Ka Haka ‘Ula O Ke‘elikōlani College of Hawaiian Language with her grand daughter Hāweoʻulakaumaka Mākaʻimoku (center), UH Hilo Chancellor Donald Straney (left) and UH System Interim President David Lassner (right) at grand opening of the college’s new home, Haleʻōlelo.

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Hawaiian language lives at UH Hilo

Keiki Kawai‘ae‘a, the director of the UH Hilo Ka Haka ‘Ula O Ke‘elikōlani College of Hawaiian Language with her grand daughter Hāweoʻulakaumaka Mākaʻimoku (center), UH Hilo Chancellor Donald Straney (left) and UH System Interim President David Lassner (right) at grand opening of the college’s new home, Haleʻōlelo.

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